Archives for category: Quilt tutorial

Tidal Lace FQs

 

Click to  my other blog: sewmessy.wordpress.com and leave a comment for a chance to win this entire collection of fat quarters!

The collection is called Tidal Lace and it was designed by the fabulous Kim Andersson for Windham Fabrics.

 

On SewMessy.wordpress.com, you will also find links to all the fabulous projects in this blog hop (and more chances to win!).

On SewMessy.wordpress.com, you will also find links to all the fabulous projects in this blog hop (and more chances to win!).

Also on SewMessy is a free pillow tutorial – so check it out, baby!

Free pillow pattern tutorial at sewmessy.wordpress.com

Free pillow pattern tutorial at sewmessy.wordpress.com

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Midnight in the City quilt.

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I wanted to make a quilt block of a house that looks a little like my house. I live in a stucco house in California. My house actually faces the hills, so I took a few liberties.

This design is very simple to make but feel free to design your own by following these steps.

Sketch:

1. First start with a sketch of the block on graph paper. I wanted my house block to finish at 12” x 12”, so each square of the graph paper represents 1”. Just draw straight lines. If I can do this, you can.

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2. I like to play with color schemes using colored pencils, so I make a couple black-and-white copies of my drawing and fill in with colors I like. My house has a teal door :).

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3. I also separated the block into columns on the graph paper, so I could easily see how to cut and assemble the pieces.

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Cutting:

White:

Cut 1 strip 2 1/2” x 12 1/2” for sky.

Cut 9 squares 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” for windows and corners of sky.

Cut 6 squares 2” x 2” for half-square triangles.

Brown:

Cut 8 squares 2” x 2” for half-square triangles.

Cut 1 strip 1 1/2” x 8 1/2”.

Cut 2 strips 1 1/2” x 7 1/2”.

Cut 2 strips 1 1/2” x 3 1/2”.

Cut 3 strips 1 1/2” x 2 1/2”.

Cut 4 squares 1 1/2” x 1 1/2”.

Light Brown:

Cut 4 squares 2” x 2” for half-square triangles.

Red:

Cut 2 squares 2” x 2” for half-square triangles.

Cut 2 squares 1 1/2” x 1 1/2”.

Cut 5 strips 1 1/2” x 2 1/2”.

Tan:

Cut 11 squares 1 1/2” x 1 1/2”.

Cut 5 strips 1 1/2” x 5 1/2”.

Teal:

Cut 1 strip 1 1/2” x 2 1/2” for door.

Green:

Cut 3 squares 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” for grass.

Half-square triangles:

1. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the wrong side of 6 white and 2 light brown and 2 red 2” x 2” squares. Place the 2” x 2” squares in pairs with right sides together as follows: 4 white squares with 4 browns squares, 2 white squares with 2 light brown squares, 2 brown squares and 2 light brown squares, and 2 brown and 2 red squares. 

2. Sew a scant 1/4” on either side of the drawn line for each pair of squares. Cut on the drawn line and press the seam of each half-square triangle toward the dark fabric. Trim each half-square triangle to 1 1/2” x 1 1/2”.

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Assemble the block:

1. Arrange the cut pieces and half-square triangles in 12 columns using the sketch for reference. Make sure the half-square triangles are properly oriented.

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2. Sew the pieces into 12 columns using a 1/4” seam allowance. Press each seam open.

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3. Pin the columns together matching seams and stitch. Press seams open.

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4. Stitch the 2 1/2” x 12 1/2” white piece to the top. Press seam toward the white piece.

5. Trim block to 12 1/2” x 12 1/2”.

Fuse simple tree, bush or sun shapes, if desired. Gorgeous!

This thread catcher is so simple to make and very useful. I’ve used it so much, that I made 2 more so I could have 1 on my ironing board and another on my cutting table.

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I took a dollar store vase and an old wrist pin cushion from junior high home ec class. I removed the plastic wrist band and threaded a ribbon through the back of the pin cushion. I wrapped the ribbon around the narrowest part of the vase and tied a big bow in the back of the vase, like this.

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I also like to put scissors, a rotary cutter, pen or pencil inside so I have a place for everything I need. It’s easy to lift out the other items when it’s time to dump those threads and trimmings. I keep the trimmings and need to know, WHAT TO DO WITH THE TRIMMINGS?? They are too pretty to throw away.

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Now it’s back to the dollar store to get another vase so I can have a thread catcher vase by my recliner, where I do my handsewing.

Let me know what you think of this idea!

If nothing else, it beats the sad, saggy sack of yester year. Here’s a picture I pulled off the internet. Gee, I thought there was a requirement that all thread catchers be made of cat fabric. 🙂

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TUTORIAL: SIMPLE SKYLINE QUILT BLOCK

Finished block: 12 1/2” x 12 1/2”

The general idea is to piece a building fabric to the sky fabric to make a strip 2” x 12 1/2”. Make 8 of these and sew them together and you’re done. All seams are sewn using a 1/4” seam allowance.

The exact cutting dimensions* for each piece are as follows. A is the strip on the left and H is the strip on the far right.

A strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 3 1/2″, building fabric (turquoise): 2″ x 9 1/2″

B strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 5 1/2″, upper building fabric (light gray): 2″ x 3 1/2″, bottom building fabric (coral): 2″ x 4 1/2″

C strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 2 1/2″, building fabric (dark gray): 2″ x 10 1/2″

D strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 4 1/2″, building fabric (violet): 2″ x 11 1/2″

E strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 4 1/2″, building fabric (light green): 2″ x 8 1/2″

F strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 3″, building fabric (cream): 2″ x 10″

G strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 7 1/2″, building fabric (raspberry): 2″ x 5 1/2″

H strip – sky fabric: 2″ x 5 1/2″, building fabric (pink): 2″ x 11 1/2″

*I like to make my strips extra long, so I can adjust the height of each building  after I’ve made 8 strips. If you want to do this, add an inch or so to the length of each piece listed above, keeping all pieces 2” wide. For example, the sky fabric for the A strip would be cut 2” x 4 1/2” and the building fabric would be 2” x 10 1/2”.

Piece the building fabrics to the sky fabrics with right sides together using a 1/4” seam allowance. Press each seam after sewing it. See my tutorial on piecing diagonal seams as a reference, if needed. Each strip should be about 2” x 12 1/2”.

Lay out the pieced strips. Rearrange the order, if you want to. If you cut extra long strips, slide them up and down to adjust the building height as desired.

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Sew the strips into pairs.

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Sew the pairs together to complete the block. I like to press all my seams open, because it looks cool on the back, but you can press the seams to one side if you want. Either way, be sure to give it a good pressing. Here’s what my sewn block looks like on the wrong side.

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Flip it back over and trim each side to 12 1/2”. This is really easy to do if you have a 12 1/2” x 12 1/2” ruler :). I am a lefty so this may look a little funny to you.Image

You are done!

Intermediate Skyline Block

ImagePlay around with more piecing to create a more complex version of your skyline block. For my intermediate block, I pieced solid fabrics together and then trimmed the pieced sections to create 8 2” x 12 1/2” strips. Piece the 8 strips together for a 12 1/2” x 12 1/2” block.